Home » Top 7 Steve Jobs’s Failed Products

Top 7 Steve Jobs’s Failed Products

Virtually every announcement of new Apple product gives rise to dozens of critical reviews from Apple fans, who are struggling to prove “Steve Jobs would never do that!” “Steve Jobs would never approve of the notch,” “Jobs would never afford the Bendgate,” “Jobs would never refuse USB ports on the MacBook.”
be-in-the-loop - Top 7 Steve Jobs’s Failed Products

Virtually every announcement of new Apple product gives rise to dozens of critical feedbacks from Apple fans, who are struggling to prove that “Steve Jobs would never do that!” “Steve Jobs would never approve of the notch,” “Jobs would never afford the Bendgate,” “Jobs would never refuse USB ports on the MacBook.”

The main reason that all these claims are unfounded is their authors imply that Jobs has never made mistakes, all his decisions were correct, and all Apple’s items launched under Jobs’ watch were hits.

Jobs really made a revolution in various industries, creating Mac PC, iTunes, iPod and iPhone, but he also made a lot of mistakes as CEO of Apple. Here are some of failures that did happen when Jobs was brilliant leader at Apple. 

be-in-the-loop - Top 7 Steve Jobs’s Failed Products

NeXT

NeXT is a computer and software company launched by Steve Jobs in 1985, after he was fired from Apple, along with several co-workers. NeXT produced a PC OS and two generations of workstations, each of them an inky black contrast to the Snow White design scheme he chose for Apple. The company hasn’t achieved a big success and was ultimately taken over by Apple as a prelude to Jobs’ return. The NeXT platform may be better known for what was done with it than for what it actually did: in 1991, Tim Berners-Lee used one to create the first web browser and web server.

be-in-the-loop - Top 7 Steve Jobs’s Failed Products

iTunes Pin

Tim Cook often stresses that unlike Facebook, Apple would never be at the center of the scandal associated with the use of personal data. But if one of Steve Jobs’ idea caught on, Apple could be in a similar trouble. 

In September 2010, Jobs launched iTunes Ping, Apple’s music-oriented social network that went south.  “This is a symbiosis of Facebook, Twitter and iTunes. At Ping, you can subscribe to your favorite artists, friends and chat with music fans from around the world, ” Steve Jobs told on the presentation of of the iTunes Ping. 

Apple officially closed Ping in September 2012, replaced it with Facebook and Twitter integration in iTune. 

be-in-the-loop - Top 7 Steve Jobs’s Failed Products

Apple Lisa

Apple Lisa is a PC developed by Apple in January 1983. While the GUI-based system was considered a technical achievement, it was a sales failure. At an asking price of $10,000 in 1983, it cost the equivalent of over $22,000 today. Small change compared with what it cost Apple: $50 million in hardware and $100 million in development, selling just 10,000 units.

The computer was named after Steve Jobs’s first daughter Lisa Nicole Brennan, although Apple stated the name was an acronym for “Locally Integrated Software Architecture” or «LISA”. So, if the Apple Lisa name is what made Lisa Simpson a big fan of ‘Mapple,’ she might be disappointed.

be-in-the-loop - Top 7 Steve Jobs’s Failed Products

iPod Hi-Fi

In the mid-2000s, all teens were hunting for docking stations and other accessories for the iPod. Jobs found out about the sales volumes of Bose portable PA systems, and decided to enter this market. The result was a disgusting iPod Hi-Fi.

 For a start, the item costs much more than analogs with better sound quality — the price started at $ 349. In addition, only some iPod models could be connected with it directly, others needed an adapter. Speaking of the connection, the iPod was held in place only by the dock connector, and many owners accidentally pulled it off, disconnecting the iPod.

Introducing iPod Hi-Fi in 2006, Jobs announced that he had replaced his expensive home audio system with it. However, few followed in his footsteps, and Apple stopped selling the gadget 18 months after the release.

be-in-the-loop - Top 7 Steve Jobs’s Failed Products

MobileMe

MobileMe, a subscription-based collection of online services and software, was designed to enable the remote access and management of email, contacts, photos, calendar, and files. After the product’s buggy launch, Jobs gathered the responsible team in an auditorium and shortly after they walked out, someone new headed them. An eyewitness recounted Jobs’ reprimand to Fortune, including the stinging: ‘You’ve tarnished Apple’s reputation…You should hate each other for having let each other down.’

On February 28, 2011, MobileMe boxes were removed from the Apple Store shelves, and MobileMe is no longer available through official resellers.

be-in-the-loop - Top 7 Steve Jobs’s Failed Products

iPod Socks

In 2004, Jobs introduced the latest Apple’s invention — iPod Socks. These colorful knit items were sold in sets of six for $ 29. The main difference between iPod Socks and those that men often cannot find in the morning, was the Apple label. Revolutionary? Unique?…Do you really think so?

be-in-the-loop - Top 7 Steve Jobs’s Failed Products

ROKR E1

iPhones are usually considered the first phone with iTunes support, but this isn’t the case. The ROKR, a Motorola series of phones that could play music purchased from iTunes, came out in 2005. With a capacity of just 100 songs and a super slow transfer time, the ROKR’s party ended quickly. PC World magazine named the Rokr E1 one of the 25 worst technology products of all time.

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